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nice reuters article as well. and germany ranks high on the tax evasion list, in GDP percentage it’s even twice the rate of the US!

reuters:

The corporations that occupy Congress. – David Cay Johnston

interessanter beitrag zur aktuellen situation der erstarkens der bürgerpartizipation.

diskussionen um das netz basieren fast ausschließlich auf der prämisse des ’technological determinism’. ich sehe hier einen großen fehler: meiner meinung bestimmt letztenendes die gesellschaft, zu welchem zweck technologie benutzt wird. ich sehe immer mehr menschen die unzufrieden damit sind, wie die systeme seit einiger zeit (nicht mehr) funktionieren. auch der rückzug ins private klappt immer weniger. dieser gesellschaftliche zeitgeist ist der grund und auslöser für die entwicklungen in diesem jahr, das ‘internet’ nur der katalysator. ich bin jedenfalls sehr gespannt auf 2012!

das rad der geschichte ist in schwung gekommen. wir sind am ende einer ära.

good animated explanation of the occupy movement: we’re prototyping a 21st century movement. thx, TIME magazine for recognizing ‘the protester’ as the person of the year. i think activists will be the only way out of our mess.

love is the felt experience of connection to another being. an economist says ‘more for you is less for me.’ but the lover knows that more of you is more for me too. if you love somebody their happiness is your happiness. their pain is your pain. your sense of self expands to include other beings.

film project crowdfunding at indiegogo

anjali appadurai’s speech is the best thing to come out of the #cop17 UN climate change conference in durban, not counting the ever-inspiring COY.

of course, most media channels are eager to cover ‘both sides’ and tell the story of those that call this ‘agreed outcome with legal force’ a success or a ‘historic deal to save the planet’. the problem is, that it’s not a success. reaching an agreement in the wee hours may feel like a successful end of the day, but in the big picture, this agreement was an utter failure for the future of our species. it’s increasingly difficult to imagine that we won’t look back on these times as the age of stupid.

kyoto revisited

essentially, what we have on the table is a new commitment period for the kyoto protocol (KP), the decision to establish a green climate fund to deal with the consequences of climate change (adaptation) without a clear strategy for its funding, and an agreement to continue talking about a legally binding treaty and hopefully settle by 2015 (and not 2020, as proposed by the US).

celebrating this as a success is reinterpreting the kyoto protocol. KP’s success was that it was the first international agreement of this kind. however its target of reducing emissions by 5.2% from 1990 levels by the year 2012 is not ambitious. admittedly, emissions would have kept on rising so 5.2% is more ambitious that it initially sounds. however, the deindustrialization in post-soviet systems after the 1990 led to an emissions reduction that had already taken place by the time KP was negotiated. not accounting for this created approx. 8-12 billion carbon credits (1 credit = 1 ton of CO2) worth absolutely nothing – usually referred to as ’hot air’ because this reduction happened an. to put this amount of ‘hot air’ into perspective, the entire world’s emissions were just below 30 billion (2008). there are other examples of KP’s measures gone awry, such as HFC-23 projects accounting for more than half of the CDM credits. finally, the underlying logic of creating a market, applauded by economists, brought the wrong people to the table: greedy banksters who turned most of michelle chan’s ’ten ways to game the carbon market’ warnings into reality, most notably the carousel fraud in the EU ETS.

so we shouldn’t be euphoric about the result that we’ll have a second commitment period of KP. perhaps it’s better than nothing, but it’s not much. it’s certainly not what science tells us we need to do, which is to get back to 350ppm of atmospheric carbon. we’re still on the path towards a 3-4 degree warmer world, which is where we might trigger runaway climate change. some argue, this agreement lock us in on this path, leaving ‘no room for increasing the depth of carbon cuts.’

common but differentiated responsibility

during the final showdown, the EU, india and china made passionate pledges for their positions. analyzing the diplomatic negotiations would go beyond my expertise, but i have a few opinions:

– it is absolutely critical that we have a legally binding treaty on climate change that includes developing nations. they need to develop, but they shouldn’t make our mistakes all over again, we don’t have the time or the resources for more mistakes.

– that said, it’s even more important that we uphold the principle of ‘common but differentiated responsibility’ (CBDR). we need a fair deal that allows countries to develop. climate policy mustn’t be used as economic hitman policy, and we need stop the bullying immediately (salerno’s fierce response after standing on the table when she was being ignored).

– the reason why the EU/US should take on a larger role in fighting climate change is plainly because it’s the ‘developed’ world that caused the problem, not china or india. scroll down this guardian article to see the list of historical emissions, in total and per capita. how dare we put this pressure on a country with a GDP per capita of approx. $1400 (US: $47,000 | EU: $32.000) that currently emits 1.4t per capita (US: 17.5t | EU: 10.5t)?

– an aspect i find too often overlooked is the outsourcing of emissions to developing nations. indeed, china is the world’s largest polluter in total figures, but it’s also the world’s factory. it’s producing for our consumption, something easily forgotten ever since china passed the US in total emissions when the media’s tone in describing china’s carbon emissions has become quite reproachful. however, they’re only consuming 3.1t per capita (india: 1.8t) while the US is consuming 29t! there’s an interesting list on the bottom of the guardian article.

future of the climate movement

so, as our political leaders have failed us yet again in the most important issue humanity has ever faced, where do we go from here? 2011 has shown the willingness of people to take their fate into their own hands (arab spring, spanish indignados, keystone XL protests, occupy wall street and everywhere), which is a very hopeful development for the future of humanity. for now, i’d like to end with kumi naidoo’s words:

do not accept when any of us say to you that young people are the leaders of tomorrow. you have to say ‘young people are the leaders of today, we are ready to lead now!’ and if adults are not prepared to provide the leadership, you should challenge us to get out of the way and you have to step up forward and bring a new vision.

[UPDATE: check out 350.org’s coverage on the activist movement in durban]

#occupyfdp: schöne yesmanesque initiative, die FDP feindlich zu übernehmen:

Es geht hier nicht um Ihre Stimme bei der nächsten Wahl, es geht darum, die FDP mit Ihren Waffen zu schlagen – denen des Marktes.

Wir werden die FDP übernehmen. Wir werden das Programm ändern, den Einfluss der Industrie beenden und diejenigen Funktionäre entfernen, die diese Partei so unausstehlich machen. Wir sind die Erneuerung, die die FDP sich so dringend wünscht, eine grundlegende Neupositionierung der FDP auf der Basis ihrer traditionellen Werte Freiheit und Demokratie – sozial gerecht, ökologisch vorbildlich und ökonomisch umsichtig.

occupyeconomics. 300 economists stand with the occupy movement, and have published a statement.

supporting organization, econ4, caught my interest. they are proponents of economic models that benefit people, planet and the future. they have a nice video describing the problems with the friedmanite free-market disaster capitalism, but in this video below they also start mapping out solutions: they describe four necessary conditions for a better economic system:

  • – a level playing field: food, healthcare, education, clean & safe environment
  • – resilience: withstanding unexpected shocks
  • – true cost pricing: dirty products will be more expensive than clean products
  • – real democracy: reclaim democracy from self-interested parties

i fully agree with these points! the third point is what i have been saying for while now, especially when sitting in all those ‘green marketing’ conferences/talks. ecosocial products don’t have to be made more attractive, they just have to be cheaper. i don’t know anybody who would pay premium prices for products that use slave labor, degenerate their health, and steal our children’s future.

quite disturbing to see the erosion of the freedom of the press in the last years, but it seems 2011 saw some more big hits to journalists rights being respected by the police.

most recently, new york reporters met “the fists of the law”, and at the castor protests happening now, police pepperspray and beat journalists, took away their protection gear or their entire equipment, and even allowed (ordered?) a police dog to bite a journalist!

(Source: http://rt.com/)

best piece on occupy i’ve read in a while, calling it like it is! (thanks Kristyan!)

As the puzzle pieces fit together, they began to show coordination against OWS at the highest national levels.

But wait: why on earth would Congress advise violent militarised reactions against its own peaceful constituents? The answer is straightforward: in recent years, members of Congress have started entering the system as members of the middle class (or upper middle class) – but they are leaving DC privy to vast personal wealth, as we see from the “scandal” of presidential contender Newt Gingrich’s having been paid $1.8m for a few hours’ “consulting” to special interests.

I found out what it was that OWS actually wanted. […] No 3 was the most clarifying: draft laws against the little-known loophole that currently allows members of Congress to pass legislation affecting Delaware-based corporations in which they themselves are investors.

What happened this week is the first battle in a civil war; a civil war in which, for now, only one side is choosing violence. It is a battle in which members of Congress, with the collusion of the American president, sent violent, organised suppression against the people they are supposed to represent.

[UPDATE: jetzt auch in deutscher übersetzung]

bernd kolbs treffende analyse unserer zeit beim entreprenurship summit 2011, mit ein paar gedanken zu werten mit denen wir nach vorne blicken können. man kann unsere situation kaum besser beschreiben. diese stunde sollte man sich nehmen! (thx, lina!)