Liberinantes – an Italian Inspiration

Today, I experienced another one of those moments that make me love what I do. It’s not about the glamorous moments speaking to powerful people, but rather the people who are strong in their principles and ideals, make things happen on the ground, and remain humble even while moving mountains.

I had the immense pleasure to meet Alberto Urbinati today. He and 8 friends were huge football fans but could not stand the prevalent racism anymore, and wanted to do something practical about it.

So 8 years ago, they started Liberi Nantes, a football club for refugees. The team consists only of refugees and they are actually playing in the official Italian league. They are pushing for the regulations to allow them to move beyond the lowest league- imagine a refugee Serie A team!

I got to spend some time with Alberto and he even invited me to join lunch with him, the players, and the other involved people. It was a special atmosphere – I could feel much he was revered by the players and other team members while he himself remained entirely down to earth and did not accept any special privileges. I was really moved when he talked about his influences, e.g. an annual tournament without referees where it is all about the love of the game and the community, not about winning. This translated into the spirit of Liberi Nantes, in which every player knows two basic rules: smile and respect people – even in the face of hate speech or racism.

I wish I had all of our conversation on video, however, we only filmed a short version. I’ll have the interview with him online soon, until then check out the excellent guardian video above.

What a climate guy has to do with refugees

“You’re a climate guy – why are you jumping on the refugee bandwagon now?”

“Aren’t you instrumentalizing the refugees for your climate message?”

I was a bit shocked at these types of accusations when I brought up the topic of refugees in the context of climate at a few events recently. Initially, I didn’t think that mentioning this would cause a ruckus, but some people (who didn’t know me) didn’t see the connection and felt it was too far-fetched. I hadn’t realized that the links are not so well-known in the public eye yet.

To me, climate change has always been strongly linked to the displacement of people: In the simplest terms, it’s the people in coastal areas affected through the sea level rise. However, it goes a lot deeper. Climate change will fundamentally change our life on this planet, and with more extreme weather patterns will lead to less inhabitable and farmable land, which will change where on this planet people can live (well).

Back in 2010, when we hosted the German premiere of “The Age of Stupid” in Berlin, we invited Hermann Josef Hack, an artist who visualizes the looming climate refugee crisis if we fail to solve this challenge. I’m not concerned about climate change because of a romantic idea of a healthy planet – I’m pretty sure the planet and nature will survive whatever happens. The question is if we will survive, and how we will. Will we stick to our ideals of human rights when we are tested in tough times?

With so many people fleeing Syria at the moment, many don’t see that even in this case, climate change underlies the tragedy. For more than 4 years, a drought forced more than a million farmers to flee into the city. It has been well documented by the Washington Post in 2013, made easy-to-understand by this comic, and already in 2003 the Pentagon recognized the security and migration implications of climate change.

Once we understand this connection, I think it’s time to ask the question: What the hell is an “economic refugee” anyway?

Why do we choose to only help people fleeing from military conflict (and only if we recognize it as such) and not help people fleeing from extreme poverty or loosing their land? Island states such as the Maldives have been pretty vocal about the question of their future when their islands will disappear. How do we deal with these questions? When the inhabitable parts of the world shift, how do we justify our perceived right to the land we currently live on and our reflex to defend it against ‘intruders’?

I’m passionate about climate change because I believe it is the largest challenge we are facing, and I think it’s the calling of our generation to solve it for future generations. I’m passionate about solving the refugee crisis because it is the most urgent humanitarian crisis we face, and I believe that it is in times of crisis that we have an opportunity to prove that we really do stand by our values. These two causes are linked, and my engagement in both of them comes from caring for humans and the desire to make the most impact I can to leave behind a better world for us, humans.