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Seit mehr als 3 Wochen demonstrieren Flüchtlinge, die von Würzburg nach Berlin gelaufen sind, um auf das unmögliche Asylrecht aufmerksam zu machen, seit einer Woche auch im Hungerstreik vor dem Brandenburger Tor.

Dabei werden Ihnen bei Temperaturen um den Nullpunkt und Bodenfrost Decken/Isomatten von den Behörden weggenommen, sie dürfen nicht mal zur medizinischen Behandlung weder liegen noch sitzen, und auch nicht im Rollstuhl sitzen. Ständige Änderungen der Auflagen inklusive.

Öffentliche Aufmerksamkeit bis vor 2 Tagen: sehr gering. Die Medien kommen halt erst wenn sich Politpromis und/oder nackte Frauen dazustellen. Dazu ein schöner Beitrag von Ennomane.

Es sollte nicht vergessen werden, wie es zum verschärften Asylrecht kam, damals, Anfang der 90er. Da brannten Asylbewerberheime, vielleicht erinnert sich noch jemand an Rostock-Lichtenhangen. In Hoyerswerda kapitulierte der Staat und evakuierte die Asylbewerber – und schon hatten die Rechten den Erfolg den sie wollten: Hoyerswerda war ausländerfrei. An den Ressentiments scheint sich auch in den letzten 20 Jahren nicht sonderlich viel geändert zu haben. Ich kann mich auch noch sehr gut daran erinnern, und stimmte auch Martin Hyuns Artikel zu.

Dieser Artikel fasst das ganz gut zusammen, wie es dazu kam, dass ausgerechnet die Opfer (!) des Asylrechtsmissbrauchs bezichtigt wurden und als Konsequenz der Pogrome dann das Asylrecht verschärft wurde. In den Worten von Ennomane: “Eigentlich erbärmlich. Nein. Uneigentlich.”

Anbei noch ein schockierendes und recht aktuelles Video vom September, wo sich Geschichte zu wiederholen droht: ‘Hass statt Gastfreundschaft: Asyl in Wolgast’

Wen wundert es noch, dass Deutschland gerade von UN-Experten für Defizite bei der Achtung von Menschenrechten, gerade bei der Abschiebung von Asylbewerbern, kritisiert wurde.

great case study of effective creative protest in action: getting the politicians to  improve the street quality in yekaterinburg through street art intervention!

police, firefighters and civil guards have joined the protests in spain, declaring ‘somos la policía del pueblo, no de los políticos’- we are the police of the people, not the politicians!

perhaps they were shocked by the police brutality in the last days/weeks, perhaps they’ve realized that they are part of the 99% too – in any case, this is great! 

best wishes out to the indignados in españa!

oh, and for the german(speaker)s: if you haven’t read it yet, check out the perspective of an german expat in spain on what the crisis means, a view that we don’t really get in our ‘everybody-but-us-is-lazy-and-deserves-austerity’ media coverage.

tomorrow on saturday, may 5, the silent climate parade joins forces with tar sands activists in berlin to protest against the catastrophic environmental destruction shown in this shocking (but great) video!

all around the world people are organizing events on the 350.org climate impacts day to connect the dots between climate change and the dramatic spike in extreme weather events: www.climatedots.org

join us: Das TEERSANDÖL kommt! – alexanderplatz, 11:30

what happened on friday at UC davis is fucking outrageous!! the important part is mostly in the first minute of the video. peaceful protesters who are just sitting on the ground are being pepper-sprayed for no reason at all. this is how UC davis professor nathan brown describes what happened next:

Police used batons to try to push the students apart. Those they could separate, they arrested, kneeling on their bodies and pushing their heads into the ground. Those they could not separate, they pepper-sprayed directly in the face, holding these students as they did so. When students covered their eyes with their clothing, police forced open their mouths and pepper-sprayed down their throats. Several of these students were hospitalized. Others are seriously injured. One of them, forty-five minutes after being pepper-sprayed down his throat, was still coughing up blood.

being arrested after pepper-sprayed is especially painful, because you can’t wash the stuff out of your eyes or try to reduce the pain – you’re in handcuffs. i don’t even know if the word agony sufficiently describes that situation.

the council of UC faculty associations condemned the police violence, calling it “unprovoked, disproportional and excessive”. they “are outraged that the administrations of UC campuses are using police brutality to suppress dissent, free speech and peaceful assembly”.

prof. brown’s open letter to the UC davis chancellor linda p.b. katehi calls for her immediate resignation, as the person directly responsible for this course of action. i fully support prof. brown. i’d even go a step further. she should be arrested and tried for this criminal assault (i’m not a lawyer, so i don’t know if this is actually possible. it’s simply an expression of my personal sense of justice).

i wouldn’t stop there. usually i see the police as victims/puppets of those that command them (usually politicians in the executive branch), and not as malignant people. but in this case, all i see is plain cold-hearted brutality. the cop, identified as john pike, doesn’t even try to steal himself away from the scene, like NYC’s tony boloney. this guy seems pretty proud of his actions. he should stand trial as well!

more background info, more pictures. the whole world is watching. now the whole world needs to get off its ass and do something!

john pike at work

yet again, the i am not moving movie is spot on.

[UPDATE: how awesome is this movement?! they managed to protest the chancellor with their presence in absolute silence as she exited the press conference, turning it into a walk of shame!]

cognitivedissonance:

In this photo from The New York Observer, Former Philadelphia police Captain Ray Lewis, sits in zip cuffs after being arrested today in conjunction with the Occupy Wall Street protests. Another photo of Lewis protesting can be found here.

Drew Grant of The Observer writes: “There is simply nothing more bizarre than looking at images of a man in police uniform arrested and handcuffed by people wearing lower-ranking NYPD garb.”

Lewis’ arrest was caputured on video:

Lewis knew his arrest was a possibility. In a rousing speech last night, Lewis criticized the NYPD and its use of force, along with New York City Mayor Mike Bloomberg. An excerpt:

“You should, by law, only use force to protect someone’s life or to protect them from being bodily injured. If you’re not protecting somebody’s life or protecting them from bodily injury, there’s no need to use force. And the number one thing that they always have in their favor that they seldom use is negotiation – continue to talk, and talk and talk to people. You have nothing to lose by that. This bullrush–what happened last night is totally uncalled for when they did not use negotiation long enough.

“They complained about the park being dirty. Here they are worrying about dirty parks when people are starving to death, where people are freezing, where people are sleeping in subways and they’re concerned about a dirty park. That’s obnoxious, it’s arrogant, it’s ignorant, it’s disgusting.  

[The NYPD], they’re trying to get me arrested and I may disappear OK? But as soon as I’m let out of jail, I’ll be right back here and they’ll have to arrest me again. All the cops are, they’re just workers for the one percent and they don’t even realize they’re being exploited.”

Capt. Lewis truly understands what it means to protect and serve the people, and for that sir, I thank you. 

wow, what an inspiring story! good news!

remember this summer, when climate activists protested the keystone XL pipeline in front of the white house? they got themselves arrested in civil disobedience (for protesting in front of the white house?!?) to prevent the ‘game over for the climate.’

on nov 6, more than 10,000 protesters came back and circled the white house to demand an end to the pipeline. and this massive public pressure finally resulted in a victory!! last night i got an e-mail, that the decision was delayed, effectively killing the project!

this is a spectacular victory, because it seemed so unlikely: it was expected that this would pass easily, not a lot of people outside of the affected areas knew about this project, and the protest came amidst a news media dominated by the financial markets. this is a great victory, and should be a huge motivator to continue fighting the good fight!

thx, dkomm! today is october 15, join the worldwide protests for #globalchange! this is the plan for berlin action. for the berliners who can’t make it please support the movement online by posting/blogging/spreading the message; there’s also a livestream you can watch.

i’ll leave you with two more videos that have impressed me (even though i don’t agree 100%, there’s a lot of very good points made).

[EDIT: i would never have thought i’d post a video from fox, but it seems to be the best video available] here a good video on the #occupywallstreet protests, since most media outlets seem to be ignoring these news. people are gathering outside of the wall street financial institutions and protesting! apparently, adbusters started mobilizing for this protest, and then anonymous jumping on board.

it appears that the ‘arab revolutions’ are inspiring people all over the world to take their frustration to the streets and protest the systems that so obviously fail us. for two years now, it feels like we are living in a constant state of crisis. with governments all around the world failing to address these systemic problems, it’s great to see people claiming their democratic rights and speak out. this is reason for hope that we won’t be ’shocked’ into more neoconservative disaster capitalism.

[EDIT: nice collection of images and videos at al jazeera]