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the revolution will be televised – nice short documentary on the #occupy movement in the US by Livia Santos from Kumba Films (thx, bruna!)!

usually i go with gil scott-heron and argue the opposite: the structure that makes “television” prevents this media of leading to anything worthy of being called a revolution. in fact, the media have a deep interest in not documenting anything revolutionary that could uproot their comfy status as a major political force that is outside of any democratic controls.

on the other hand, i fully agree that moving images on a screen are the communication technology of the future (and probably already of the present). why else would i keep a blog on audiovisual content for a sustainable future!? that’s why i hope for more cinematographers and people using their 5D(-equivalent)s to make great-looking films about inspiring people/movements/events to transmit the important messages of our time.

“if you try and stop the pen, then you’re inviting the gun”

nice video from the occupy india / anonymous protests on june 9, against the indian government’s efforts to shut down internet sites including e.g. vimeo (how the hell did they pick vimeo that’s really known for high-quality videos that are shared by their producers!?). NH7 also published an interesting chat with anonymous india. (video by the awesome now delhi, discovered at wild city)

as a part of occupy berlin, i’m so happy to see this! people around the world are standing up for their legitimate rights. young people everywhere are realizing that we need to change the world. that democracy needs action and active participation. that they will no longer by silenced by the opium of consumerism or straight out oppression. right now, #opindia is fighting internet censorship, but who knows what will be next. maybe corruption?

one thing i am a little wary of is the aggressive tone. yes, it’s quite typical for anonymous, but not that typical for occupy. i’d like to contribute this video (on vimeo!!) from occupylove to the movement here, with charles eisenstein (the gift economy) talking about creating a world that works for everybody.

occupyeconomics. 300 economists stand with the occupy movement, and have published a statement.

supporting organization, econ4, caught my interest. they are proponents of economic models that benefit people, planet and the future. they have a nice video describing the problems with the friedmanite free-market disaster capitalism, but in this video below they also start mapping out solutions: they describe four necessary conditions for a better economic system:

  • – a level playing field: food, healthcare, education, clean & safe environment
  • – resilience: withstanding unexpected shocks
  • – true cost pricing: dirty products will be more expensive than clean products
  • – real democracy: reclaim democracy from self-interested parties

i fully agree with these points! the third point is what i have been saying for while now, especially when sitting in all those ‘green marketing’ conferences/talks. ecosocial products don’t have to be made more attractive, they just have to be cheaper. i don’t know anybody who would pay premium prices for products that use slave labor, degenerate their health, and steal our children’s future.

quite disturbing to see the erosion of the freedom of the press in the last years, but it seems 2011 saw some more big hits to journalists rights being respected by the police.

most recently, new york reporters met “the fists of the law”, and at the castor protests happening now, police pepperspray and beat journalists, took away their protection gear or their entire equipment, and even allowed (ordered?) a police dog to bite a journalist!

(Source: http://rt.com/)

best piece on occupy i’ve read in a while, calling it like it is! (thanks Kristyan!)

As the puzzle pieces fit together, they began to show coordination against OWS at the highest national levels.

But wait: why on earth would Congress advise violent militarised reactions against its own peaceful constituents? The answer is straightforward: in recent years, members of Congress have started entering the system as members of the middle class (or upper middle class) – but they are leaving DC privy to vast personal wealth, as we see from the “scandal” of presidential contender Newt Gingrich’s having been paid $1.8m for a few hours’ “consulting” to special interests.

I found out what it was that OWS actually wanted. […] No 3 was the most clarifying: draft laws against the little-known loophole that currently allows members of Congress to pass legislation affecting Delaware-based corporations in which they themselves are investors.

What happened this week is the first battle in a civil war; a civil war in which, for now, only one side is choosing violence. It is a battle in which members of Congress, with the collusion of the American president, sent violent, organised suppression against the people they are supposed to represent.

[UPDATE: jetzt auch in deutscher übersetzung]

goldman sachs conquering europe? simon johnson argues ‘what you have in europe is a shared world-view among the policy elite and the bankers, a shared set of goals and mutual reinforcement of illusions.’

what happened on friday at UC davis is fucking outrageous!! the important part is mostly in the first minute of the video. peaceful protesters who are just sitting on the ground are being pepper-sprayed for no reason at all. this is how UC davis professor nathan brown describes what happened next:

Police used batons to try to push the students apart. Those they could separate, they arrested, kneeling on their bodies and pushing their heads into the ground. Those they could not separate, they pepper-sprayed directly in the face, holding these students as they did so. When students covered their eyes with their clothing, police forced open their mouths and pepper-sprayed down their throats. Several of these students were hospitalized. Others are seriously injured. One of them, forty-five minutes after being pepper-sprayed down his throat, was still coughing up blood.

being arrested after pepper-sprayed is especially painful, because you can’t wash the stuff out of your eyes or try to reduce the pain – you’re in handcuffs. i don’t even know if the word agony sufficiently describes that situation.

the council of UC faculty associations condemned the police violence, calling it “unprovoked, disproportional and excessive”. they “are outraged that the administrations of UC campuses are using police brutality to suppress dissent, free speech and peaceful assembly”.

prof. brown’s open letter to the UC davis chancellor linda p.b. katehi calls for her immediate resignation, as the person directly responsible for this course of action. i fully support prof. brown. i’d even go a step further. she should be arrested and tried for this criminal assault (i’m not a lawyer, so i don’t know if this is actually possible. it’s simply an expression of my personal sense of justice).

i wouldn’t stop there. usually i see the police as victims/puppets of those that command them (usually politicians in the executive branch), and not as malignant people. but in this case, all i see is plain cold-hearted brutality. the cop, identified as john pike, doesn’t even try to steal himself away from the scene, like NYC’s tony boloney. this guy seems pretty proud of his actions. he should stand trial as well!

more background info, more pictures. the whole world is watching. now the whole world needs to get off its ass and do something!

john pike at work

yet again, the i am not moving movie is spot on.

[UPDATE: how awesome is this movement?! they managed to protest the chancellor with their presence in absolute silence as she exited the press conference, turning it into a walk of shame!]

cognitivedissonance:

In this photo from The New York Observer, Former Philadelphia police Captain Ray Lewis, sits in zip cuffs after being arrested today in conjunction with the Occupy Wall Street protests. Another photo of Lewis protesting can be found here.

Drew Grant of The Observer writes: “There is simply nothing more bizarre than looking at images of a man in police uniform arrested and handcuffed by people wearing lower-ranking NYPD garb.”

Lewis’ arrest was caputured on video:

Lewis knew his arrest was a possibility. In a rousing speech last night, Lewis criticized the NYPD and its use of force, along with New York City Mayor Mike Bloomberg. An excerpt:

“You should, by law, only use force to protect someone’s life or to protect them from being bodily injured. If you’re not protecting somebody’s life or protecting them from bodily injury, there’s no need to use force. And the number one thing that they always have in their favor that they seldom use is negotiation – continue to talk, and talk and talk to people. You have nothing to lose by that. This bullrush–what happened last night is totally uncalled for when they did not use negotiation long enough.

“They complained about the park being dirty. Here they are worrying about dirty parks when people are starving to death, where people are freezing, where people are sleeping in subways and they’re concerned about a dirty park. That’s obnoxious, it’s arrogant, it’s ignorant, it’s disgusting.  

[The NYPD], they’re trying to get me arrested and I may disappear OK? But as soon as I’m let out of jail, I’ll be right back here and they’ll have to arrest me again. All the cops are, they’re just workers for the one percent and they don’t even realize they’re being exploited.”

Capt. Lewis truly understands what it means to protect and serve the people, and for that sir, I thank you.