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obama could sign the NDAA (allow american citizens to be arrested on U.S. soil by the military without charge and detained indefinitely) as early as wednesday? that should take care of any leftover glimmer of hope in obama. that’s definitely a change alright, just not quite the one most people were hoping for (of a nobel peace prize winner, ha!): guantanamo forever.

every day it gets increasingly difficult to dispute that the US is a civilization in (rapid) decline. jon stewart’s daily show will one day likely be a historic record of this former superpower’s farcical political landscape and its deconstruction in the name of ‘economic progress’ and ideological ‘wars on terror’. don’t enough US citizens realize that every day their country is getting less robust, less fit to meet the challenges of the future (admittedly, europe isn’t doing such a swell job either, but the US is just crass)?

today i read some shocking figures on business insider (better version, less clicking), even though they just confirm the economic picture publicized in the wake of occupy. 57% of children live in ‘low income’ or impoverished homes. that’s more than half of a future generation that has been denied an equal opportunity. one out of three americans would not be able to pay their rent/mortgage next month if they lost their job. with such little back-up, it’s understandable that ‘medical debt’ accounts for 60% of bankruptcies. 50 million uninsured americans (16.7% of the pop’n, 1 out of 6) needn’t even lose their jobs to go bankrupt, but just have an accident or a medical problem.

how can one expect a nation to solve even the slightest future challenge, when it’s busy with so many self-created problems? it’s like a terminal-stage cancer patient trying to run a marathon (and not realizing the competition is actually a triathlon). one such challenge is that the US will eventually become one of the world’s climate change hotspots. closely related is the fact that an addiction to a limited ressource (fossil fuels) is simply suicidal.

occupy needs to make a major impact very soon for the US to be part of the future. if NDAA passes, it will present an even larger challenge and even slimmer chances of success.

an abbreviated history of fossil fuels, by the post carbon institute, from which i also posted this excellent analysis on growth. the title of this video sums up my idea of the near future quite well: ‘the next ten years will be very unlike the last 10 years.’

PCI’s point is that, we have to learn four things very fast:

  • – learn to live without fossil fuels
  • – adapt to the end of economic growth as we know it
  • – support 7 billion humans and stabilize population
  • – deal with our legacy of environmental destruction

can we?

wow, what an inspiring story! good news!

remember this summer, when climate activists protested the keystone XL pipeline in front of the white house? they got themselves arrested in civil disobedience (for protesting in front of the white house?!?) to prevent the ‘game over for the climate.’

on nov 6, more than 10,000 protesters came back and circled the white house to demand an end to the pipeline. and this massive public pressure finally resulted in a victory!! last night i got an e-mail, that the decision was delayed, effectively killing the project!

this is a spectacular victory, because it seemed so unlikely: it was expected that this would pass easily, not a lot of people outside of the affected areas knew about this project, and the protest came amidst a news media dominated by the financial markets. this is a great victory, and should be a huge motivator to continue fighting the good fight!

nice info graphic from 350.org on gas prices, subsidies and fossil fuel economics/politics!

it’s time to move beyond this! join moving planet on september 24th, 2011 coming to a city near you!

thx, maxistentialist!